Tim Tebow Released; Jets Figure Out What Merril Hoge Always Knew

by Kent Sterling

imagesOnly one back-up quarterback in NFL history could claim a breaking news alert on ESPN for his release, and it happened today with Tim Tebow.  The New York Jets cut ties with Tebow this morning, and the coverage is just short of the death of a former president.

The Jets drafted Geno Smith, signed David Garrard in March, and still have Mark Sanchez under contract so there is no room at the inn for Tebow, America’s favorite irrelevant quarterback.

Sports is usually a meritocracy.  The people who are talked about are the people who produce on the field.  It’s not Hollywood where subjectivity allows for fame to be conferred through curious behavior.  Cash is earned in sports.  Paris Hilton can’t exist in sports, and neither can Tebow.

Tebow may be a wonderful human being and a magical leader, but he cannot play quarterback at the NFL level.  ESPN’s Merril Hoge tried to tell us that, and it damn near ruined his career as an analyst.  That Hoge told the truth was meaningless because he insulted a revered Christian.

Now, because Tebow is incapable of taking no for an answer, he will continue to work hard to earn an invitation to play elsewhere, and that team will regret the decision to sign him immediately.  Tebow is a media darling who has inspired millions through his clean living and devotion to Christ.

That fosters a wide chasm between popularity and ability, which allows a grotesque environment for everyone associated with an NFL team that signs him.  Football games in the NFL aren’t won by the most reverent team – they are won by the fastest, most precise, and meanest men.  Criminals and Christians are on equal footing on the gridiron.

It would have made for a great story to have Tebow suddenly figure out how to throw a football as truly as he lives his life, but that’s not what happened.

Football experts like Bill Polian are claiming that Tebow will not get another job in the NFL unless he “publicly renounces” his position as quarterback.  Tebow renouncing his standing as a quarterback/leader on a football team is as likely as his renunciation of his belief in Christ.

A quarterback is not just what he did for a living, it represents who he is as a human being.  And with the right arm of Drew Brees or Peyton Manning, he would have been an all-time great.

Failing as an NFL quarterback will not define Tebow’s legacy.  He was one of the all-time greats for Urban Meyer at the University of Florida, and in Gainesville his legendary leadership will be celebrated forever.  But the NFL isn’t the SEC, and Tebow isn’t a Manning.

NFL fans who jumped on Hoge for accurately assessing Tebow owe him an apology.  He told the truth better than Tebow throws a football.

67 thoughts on “Tim Tebow Released; Jets Figure Out What Merril Hoge Always Knew

  1. GTD

    Hold on. Its not that Merrill Hoge said he couldn’t play QB. Merrill took it to a whole different level. Making comments like “phony as a $3 bill” etc. I’m a Bills fan… hate the Jets, a Clemson fan, no ties to UF at all. I am speaking as a footnball fan. There was something personal in Hoge’s attack and THAT is why he was in hot water.

    Reply
    1. kentsterling Post author

      I never heard anything personal. In fact, I’ve never heard Merril say anything personal about anyone – either on ESPN or while playing golf with him. He is always honest and has a way of framing an argument that is compelling as hell, and that might rub some wrong if they disagree, but it’s not intended as personal.

      Reply
      1. Bruce Bateman

        You either haven’t heard everything that Hoge has had to say about Tebow or your article is more about supporting your golfing buddy. As one of the many ex-jock talking heads that fill the halls of ESPN’S, Hoge has done an excellent job at keeping his own name somewhat relevant not by his own intelligent analysis but by his mean-spirited approach when commenting on Tebow. He completely diminishes anything that he has to say by the way he chooses to do it in order to gain attention to himself. Boomer Easion has done much of the same regarding Tebow but the difference is that Easion actually has some credibility from his playing career and a bit of intelligence regarding his on-air talent and football commentary. Hoge doesn’t appear to have any of this so that’s why you don’t see him in a bigger role than the “inflammatory” critic disquised as a football expert.

        Reply
        1. kentsterling Post author

          What Hoge said in my memory, and in all the reports of the incident I can find is that Tebow’s reaction to having Greg McElroy elevated past him into the starting role when Mark Sanchez was benched ‘smelled like three-day old fish,” and that Tebow is as “phony as a three-dollar bill” for refusing to run the wildcat offense for the Jets. His reaction was based upon this report by ESPN New York:

          “New York Jets backup quarterback Tim Tebow was so frustrated when the starting job was conferred upon Greg McElroy early last week that he told the coaches he didn’t want to be used in any Wildcat packages Sunday against the San Diego Chargers, multiple Jets sources told ESPNNewYork.com.”

          If the report was true, Tebow portraying himself as a team first guy who would do anything to help the team, and then refusing, is a hypocritical act.

          Hoge used colorful language in describing it, but in what way was he wrong?

          Reply
          1. Bruce Bateman

            C’mon Man!! If you can’t find other resources besides what ESPN reports then you’re just not really looking or choosing to see only the side you agree with. Case in point… try this source which I found in 30 seconds with a simple Google search… http://americanlivewire.com/should-merril-hoge-be-fired-for-tim-tebow-comments/

            If we want to get technical about it, maybe we should question Hoge’s willingness to make these kind of comments before he has confirmed facts. Oh… wait… that might’ve prohibited him from drawing the kind of attention he seems to crave.

            You also seem to be centering all of your view around Hoge’s “Phony as a 3-Dollar Bill” comment but I’d also suggest that you go back further and research comments on Tebow from Hoge during Tebow’s 2011 season with Denver. If anything, Hoge has been consistent with his personal criticism regarding Tebow from the start. My guess is that with so many so-called media experts yapping the same thing over and over again, Hoge felt the need to standout so this is the way he chose to do it. Trying to mask the way he delivers his criticism by calling it “colorful language” is just ridiculous and a plain lazy defense of it.

          2. kentsterling Post author

            I read the americanlivewire.com piece, but it didn’t report Hoge saying anything that wasn’t already in the other pieces. It had quotes from Tebow’s rebuttal, but that wasn’t the point.

            That he believed the ESPN New York piece is not evidence of laziness or spurious intent. I’ve only heard or read that Tebow behaved exactly as reported, and then calmed down and reversed his refusal to run the wildcat.

            Hoge’s job – as well as that of each of the analysts who work at every level of media – is to bring unique perspective to newsworthy issues. Colorful language that sticks in the minds of consumers is a significant part of that.

            Hope works his ass off to gather information to communicate informed perspective. That’s what he did with Tebow, and he was right.

    2. Terry Harder

      Guys like Merril Hoge don’t like it when exceptional people are successful. That’s all Tim Tebow has ever been: successful. And the fact that he is a Christian makes it even more difficult to accept by people like Hoge. What I really like & get excited about is how all you so-called expert analysts have it all figured out. What a joke! Tebow was effectively successful in Denver and you hate it. Just like Hoge, you DON’T know what real success is. Sad for you – Tim Tebow is a man of exceptional stature both professionally and personally, and he will continue to be successful in both areas whether you see it or not. You don’t call his shots! That I’m truly thankful for.

      Reply
      1. kentsterling Post author

        Once teams were able to scheme for Tebow he was anything but successful in Denver. Thirty-one teams refused to part with a seventh round pick to get Tebow. That has nothing to do with Christianity. He can’t deliver a football as accurately as other quarterbacks.

        If he wants to be a tight end, I’m sure he’ll do that well enough to earn a roster spot. If not, he’s either go to the CFL or embark on a very successful public speaking career.

        Being a great human being, and he may be one of those, does not help convey a football to a receiver.

        Criticizing a quarterback does not equate to criticizing the man.

        Get over yourself.

        Reply
        1. Bruce Bateman

          Again, you’re missing the point. It’s the not the criticism of Tebow’s QB skills that are in question regarding Hogue… It’s the personal attacks and comments that he uses to do it. Many of these are on tape and quoted in copy so again, either you don’t recognize them or your stance is more about defending Hogue. You are most certainly in the minority here…

          Reply
      1. kentsterling Post author

        Hoge is one of the best analysts in media. He works hard, and tells the truth in a colorful way. That’s the job. His misstep was in criticizing a player with whom millions feel a personal connection. They are blinded by the spiritual traits they share with Tebow and can’t see the lack of ability that has Tebow currently unemployed.

        That hot water isn’t holy.

        Reply
        1. Terry Harder

          Your referencing Tebow’s ” lack of ability” is hilarious! That reference alone shows your lack of intelligent analysis of an athlete and what true athleticism really is. Oh yeah, concerning Tebow, it is holy water :-). Furthermore, Josh Duhamel’s tweet concerning Hoge were right on.

          Reply
        2. Bruce Bateman

          Here’s another example of one “the best analysts in media” going overboard on another fellow analyst who dared to express their opinion on something that Hoge feels he is an absolute expert on because it’s happened to him. Again… a little too personal we think. I’d encourage looking at the follow-up comments to this article as well…
          http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/05/04/merril-hoge-kurt-warner-is-uneducated-and-irresponsible/

          Reply
          1. kentsterling Post author

            Even Warner backtracked. What did Hoge say that was wrong? Exercise is good? Head injury should be treated correctly? Warner spoke before knowing the facts?

          2. Bruce Bateman

            Kent,

            As your replies to my comments are no longer offering me the ability to reply directly to them, I’ll go ahead and post here.

            You continue to ignore the point that everyone here is trying to make to you and that is that no one, including me, is disputing that Hoge is paid to be an “expert analyst” however the personal and mean-spirited way in which he chooses to do it is what everyone takes issue with. You keep avoiding this aspect of the discussion by going on and on about “colorful language” and “unique perspective” being used by Hoge to make sure his message “sticks in the mind” of consumers. Well congratulations… you’ve finally come close to what are point is… Hoge is using cheap and inflammatory comments to draw attention to himself because he doesn’t have the talent to do it any other way.

            With that being said, I declare that this will be my last comment as it’s clearly apparent that your agenda is really about supporting and defending Hoge rather than really discussing the Tebow situation. The headline of your article alone is the biggest tip-off. I haven’t seen a comment yet on your article that supports your objective so I think the message regarding Merrill Hoge and his talents as a football analyst are already being clearly voiced by your readers.

            Good luck on the next article!

          3. kentsterling Post author

            No one ever writes that they concur. What would be the point of that?

            You perceive Hoge as mean-spirited. I see him as honest. Different strokes for different folks. You say his comments are cheap and inflammatory, and I think that people in the NFL – especially those who welcome the spotlight should nut up and accept the fact that people who stand there get examined and criticized.

            The job of every person at ESPN is to stand out in some way, shape, or form. And they all do it in different ways.

            The are three versions of the truth – yours, mine, and the actual truth. You are welcome to your version.

        3. onajurny@aol.com

          Kent.
          You should stick your head up your ass and see if you can find your brain.
          Tebow is on the 3 time Super Bowl champions PATRIOTS
          who believe that Tebow should be “EMPLOYED”.
          And yet…you think we should listen to YOU AND IDIOT MERRILL…who moronicly think he shouldnt.
          WHAT A JOKE!!
          HMMMM….LETS SEE
          1- Your’s and Merrills opinion..
          2- 3 Time Super Bowl Champs opinion..
          Your credibility- in one swift stroke-
          has been done away with.
          Stop writing blogs…You’re an idiot.

          Reply
          1. kentsterling Post author

            The Patriots Super Bowls were won in a deep and dark past. The magic, if there was any, is gone. The Patriots cheated to beat the Rams, and now you’re grasping at straws tied together in the shape of a cross.

  2. Lowell Weddington

    You say you never heard anything personal from Houge! You weren’t listening! What he said was as personal as personal can get. He wants to criticize Tebow’s skills, fine. But it exhibits very LOW character to criticize on a personal level. You must have meant the you never heard Tebow criticize anyone. That I believe.

    Reply
    1. kentsterling Post author

      What Hoge said in my memory, and in all the reports of the incident I can find is that Tebow’s reaction to having Greg McElroy elevated past him into the starting role when Mark Sanchez was benched ‘smelled like three-day old fish,” and that Tebow is as “phony as a three-dollar bill” for refusing to run the wildcat offense for the Jets. His reaction was based upon this report by ESPN New York:

      “New York Jets backup quarterback Tim Tebow was so frustrated when the starting job was conferred upon Greg McElroy early last week that he told the coaches he didn’t want to be used in any Wildcat packages Sunday against the San Diego Chargers, multiple Jets sources told ESPNNewYork.com.”

      If the report was true, Tebow portraying himself as a team first guy who would do anything to help the team, and then refusing, is a hypocritical act.

      Hoge used colorful language in describing it, but in what way was he wrong?

      Reply
    1. Terry Harder

      Look at all the supposedly successful quarterbacks in the NFL that are losers. And they supposedly have all the right tools? laugh out loud. One thing they don’t have the Tebow has is that he’s a winner and he knows how to win. That’s what matters in the end – it’s not how you get there! He may have a different set of tools as a quarterback, but that doesn’t matter if he wins!

      Reply
  3. Chad

    Hoge didn’t personally attack Tebow? Are you kidding me? Hoge has no class period. And as for Tebow’s football skills, he only set the high school PASSING record as a senior, won a heisman trophy, 2 national championships, is 9-7 as a starter and won his first playoff game. How many NFL QB’s have that on their resume after only a few yers in the league? Last time Tebow was givin a chance as a starter he was successful. Actually every time he has been a starter he has been successfull. So why all you so called experts love to hat on him? You must like the attention, that’s all I can figure.

    Reply
    1. kentsterling Post author

      There are more than 100 quarterbacks currently signed to NFL rosters, and that is something Tebow is not. There are 31 teams who refused to trade a seventh round draft pick for Tebow. Are they all part of this massive conspiracy to tarnish Tebow? Once teams properly schemed for what Tebow does well, he was anything but successful.

      Tebow has the worst completion percentage of any quarterback since 2010, and the third worst QBR.

      He was an outstandinghigh school and college quarterback, but cannot play the position well enough to play in the NFL, and there isn’t a single GM or analyst who feels differently.

      There is a hell of a lot more attention for people willing to stump for Tebow. I would get significantly more traffic for espousing crazy and uninformed perspective, but that’s not what I do.

      Reply
      1. Terry Harder

        It depends on the stats that you want to look at. To be fair and honest stats don’t always tell the Complete story. Chad’s stats were pretty damn good! Especially the stat that says W I N!

        Reply
        1. Terry Harder

          Bruce Bateman at five: oh 9 PM said it all very well. He made the point very clearly. That’s exactly where you’re at. Hey, can’t be right all of the time – sorry Kent. Just like Merril Hoge – you’re wrong about Tim Tebow.

          Reply
          1. Terry Harder

            Sorry fella. Wrong again. You DON’T have 32 GM’s on your side. You don’t know that. That’s pure B…S…!

          2. kentsterling Post author

            31 GMs passed on trading a seventh rounder for a quarterback taken 25th overall entering his fourth season. The other decided to release him.

          3. Art K

            i would think that if 32 GMs don’t want him, honestly, that’s that.

            i don’t think he’s anywhere close to a starter, but i don’t think he’s the worst qb in the league. that being said, i agree that tebow’s supporters are enough of a detriment to him that he won’t get another shot in the league.

  4. Chad

    He wins games, no big deal. He comes through in the clutch, no big deal. He’s a natural leader, no big deal. Nothing to see here, move along.

    Reply
    1. kentsterling Post author

      All 32 NFL teams must be allergic to winning. He lost four of his last five starts, no big deal. He led the league in fumbles while starting 11 games, no big deal. No one wanted to part with a seventh rounder for Tebow, no big deal. He was last in the NFL among QBs who started at least 14 games since 2010 in completion percentage, no big deal. And on and on and on and on.

      What’s the matter with being objective for five minutes?

      Reply
      1. Bruce Bateman

        OK… I couldn’t resist. You ask for objectivity? How about some statistical FACTS??

        How does Tebow compare with other quarterbacks in this league at the same stage of their careers? – (FIRST 16 Games as starter)

        The FACTS show…
        Tebow is off to a better start as an NFL quarterback than many of the greatest quarterbacks in NFL history. Through his first 16 starts, Tebow won more games (9) than Peyton Manning (3), Troy Aikman (3), Steve Young (3), Aaron Rodgers (5), Matthew Stafford (6), Sam Bradford (7), Eli Manning (7), John Elway (8), and Drew Brees (8). Tebow accomplished that with a team that was 1-4 before he took over, and had won only 7 of its last 24 games.
        In his first 16 starts, Tebow led his team to a playoff victory. None of these other greats did that. In fact, it took Peyton Manning, one of the greatest quarterbacks in NFL history, five full NFL seasons to lead his team to a playoff victory.
        In his first playoff game, Tebow threw for 316 yards in a winning effort — against the best defense in the league. It is so difficult for an NFL quarterback to throw for 316 yards or more in a playoff victory that Ben Roethlisberger has never done it. Brett Favre and Aaron Rodgers have each done it once. Tom Brady, John Elway and Joe Montana each did it twice. Eli Manning did not throw for that many yards in a playoff game until this season. And those other quarterbacks had some of the best receivers in the NFL. Tebow is also near the top in another important measure of an NFL passer, which is the number of touchdown passes per pass attempt. In his first 16 games, Tebow averaged an impressive one touchdown pass for every 23 pass attempts (1-23). The same as Peyton Manning. Better than Steve Young (1-46), John Elway (1-36), Drew Brees (1-34) and Tom Brady (1-36). And just slightly behind Aaron Rodgers (1-21), Matthew Stafford (1-21), and Eli Manning (1-21).
        Even more important is the fact that Tebow threw very few interceptions per pass attempt. Just one pick for every 43 pass attempts (1-43). That’s twice as good as Peyton Manning (1-21). Much better than Elway (1-19), Stafford (1-26) and Eli Manning (1-29). Better than Brees (1-34), Brady (1-36), Rodgers (1-39) and Bradford (1-40). This fact is particularly important, because ESPN contends that the chance of a team winning an NFL game goes down 20 percent with each interception a quarterback throws.
        Through 16 starts, Tebow has a far better touchdown pass-to-interception ratio (17 touchdowns-9 interceptions) than Peyton Manning (26-28), Brees (15-15), Stafford (28-23), Bradford (18-15), Elway (10-19), Aikman (12-25) and Young (9-16). Tebow’s rate is also better than Eli Manning’s (21-14), and the same as Aaron Rodgers’ (23-12).

        While I’m not saying that Tebow will ever be as good as any of the others mentioned here, I think that these numbers make a pretty compelling argument that he has earned a full opportunity to succeed or fail. How’s that for objectivity?

        Reply
        1. Chad

          Right on the money Bruce, but winning games is not as important as having a pretty throwing motion. Winning games is so overrated these days. This Kent Sterling guy needs to keep his street cred up with his fellow sports journalists, because he clearly does not see any importance in winning. He falls back to turning it around by saying that since all 32 teams don’t believe in him he must not be good. Sheep make their decisions based on that philosophy.

          Reply
          1. Terry Harder

            Chad! Your good man really good this comment is great and you hit the nail on the head once again!

        2. Terry Harder

          Salute Bruce! I Could not have said it better myself! The fact is that the so-called expert analysts and football Gurus don’t want to see Tim Tebow succeed because he already is a tremendous success and because of his outspoken faith in Jesus Christ. As you just showed statistically early on in his NFL career he is much better than all of the remaining quarterbacks in the NFL. When given the opportunity, Tim Tebow is better than any of the quarterbacks in the NFL presently. That’s a fact.

          Reply
          1. Bruce Bateman

            Thanks Terry and Chad… I must confess that I’ve kept these stats handy since the end of the 2011 season. While I am a Tebow supporter, it’s more from a stand point that I think he has not been given the kind of opportunity to display a large enough body of work to warrant the kind of criticism that he currently receives. One would think that “winning” would be the only metric that anyone should care about but that doesn’t seem to be the case regarding Tebow so having all of these stats seems like the only way to speak the language of those who doubt him.

            I am enough of a realist to know that Tebow does indeed need to improve his skills BUT all of these other QB’s were given the right opportunity to prove their value. Tebow has been successful at EVERY level he was given the right opportunity and has most certainly displayed potential on the limited opportunity he’s been given at the pro level. People forget that his success at Denver was with a “make-shift” offense, limited weapons, and VERY conservative game planning. Let’s see how Tebow does with some offensive talent around him and a game plan suited to his strengths. Not sure if he’ll ever get this chance BUT I’d like to see him get a shot. If he fails after that then I’ll be one of the first to admit his shortcomings as an NFL QB.

          2. Terry Harder

            Bruce: you say it very well. You stated the facts and your argument very accurately and precisely. You make a very very good valid point concerning Tebow in what he’s been given to work with during his tenure in the NFL. I think you nailed it concerning Tebow and what he is been dealt by the teams coaches and analysts in the NFL to this point: He’s not been given an honest and fair shot at what he can do with the skill set that he has. I’m still believing that there’s a team that will
            give him that shot! If not, it’s the NFL’s loss.

          3. kentsterling Post author

            Shots aren’t given in the NFL, they are earned. If anyone in the NFL thought they would have a better chance to win with Tebow under center, that’s where he would be. I love all of the passion in these comments. We obviously disagree. but I admire your intractability.

          4. Terry Harder

            … and Tebow has earned that right! He earned it at Denver and they shafted him. And Rex Ryan and the Jets lied to him and shafted him again. Like one analyst said recently, the NFL coaches, owners and critics are wanting Tebow to fail and setting him up to do just that. John Elway is a jerk! And it will do him well when his famous quarterback falls short in the clutch and fails once again to make it thru the playoffs and to the Super Bowl. Manning will not win a Super Bowl with the Broncos.

          5. kentsterling Post author

            He sure gets the shaft a lot playing for coaches who make millions based on their ability to win. To imply any reasonable comparison to Peyton Manning is lunacy, although I believe you are right that Manning will not win another Super Bowl.

          6. Terry Harder

            In a clutch situation and with the game on the line, I would take Tim Tebow before Peyton Manning – absolutely!

        3. kentsterling Post author

          I appreciate you efforts, but there is a fatal flaw in the first 16 games as a starter argument. Many of those quarterbacks were the first overall pick – meaning they joined the worst team in the NFL. Tebow was a component for a Broncos team that chose him 25th.

          You’re right about the interception ratio.

          Reply
          1. Bruce Bateman

            Not really sure that this “fatal flaw” theory holds up as the “first overall pick to the worst team in the NFL” would only apply to Aikman and Stafford (does this equate to “many”?) AND just for a comparison, the Broncos were 1-4 before Tebow’s first start in 2011 and had a 4-12 record his rookie year. He started the last 3 games of his rookie season and went 1-2.

            You can debate all you want but TWO FACTS remain…
            1. Tebow’s first 16 game numbers (as a “component”) show that he’s earned the right to continue his development compared to what the others achieved at the same stage.
            2. He has NOT been given the same level of support as ANY of the other QB’s mentioned earlier.

            You should ask your buddy Hoge to address this comparison. I bet he falls back on the “eye test” theory. The league is about wins, not beauty. Go ask guys like Ryan Leaf, JaMarcus Russell or Andre Ware…

          2. kentsterling Post author

            It also is the case for Bradford and Manning – two other QBs you cited. It’s not necessarily an eye test, but an evaluation of mechanics and ability to make a specific battery of throws.

            Above all else, NFL teams want to win, and they will take risks to get that done when they have a reason to believe it will pay off.

            My fascination with Tebow is driven by the disproportionate amount of support that he gets for a relatively skinny body of work.

            John Fox milked Tebow for all he was worth when presented no alternative, and piad for it by going 1-4 over Tebow’s last five starts.

            Where’s the outrage for Rex Grossman being benched – he went to a Super Bowl with the Bears.

          3. Bruce Bateman

            C’mon Kent… I thought your real fascination was with demonstrating why Merril Hoge is such a first rate football analyst? Instead you say it’s regarding the amount of support Tebow gets for such a “skinny body of work”. Well you’re right, it is a skinny body of work BUT the results of the work have produced a winning record and a first round playoff victory. What more does one need to do in order to prove their worthiness to continue development as an NFL QB and INCREASE that body of work. THAT’S THE POINT!!!

            Also, saying that John Fox had no other alternatives is just stupid. He had Brady Quinn and Adam Weber, both who are now on NFL rosters. And saying that “he paid” for it by going 1-4 in his last four starts is also lame since they made the playoffs which is the objective. If “paying the price” of using Tebow as your QB means going to the playoffs then I’m sure you’ll see a lot of Head Coaches reaching for their wallet.

            And what does Rex Grossman have to do with anything pertaining to our discussion? Other than him also being a Gator, I’m not sure what he has to do with anything unless we have proof that Hoge has needlessly attacked him too during his analysis. Stay on point my friend and stop deflecting…

          4. kentsterling Post author

            Grossman is a relentlessly mediocre quarterback who led the Bears to a Super Bowl. If Tebow deserves another chance to start, surely Grossman does.

            Brady Quinn and Adam Weber are not legitimate alternatives to start for any team, much less one with playoff hopes.

            Increasing the body of work for a quarterback known to be lacking in core quarterback abilities is ridiculous. If a car salesman posts the worst closing ratio at the dealership, you would want him to get more opportunities with better prospects to prove that he’s as bad as everyone believes. Not the way any reasonable person runs a business.

          5. Bruce Bateman

            If we must discuss Rex Grossman related to Tebow than so be it…

            Grossman was indeed given several more chances to start with both the Bears and Redskins after his 2006 Super Bowl year (Go check his stats) AND he remains on the Redskins roster today as a back-up so I’d have to say that Grossman has certainly been given ample opportunity to prove himself as a starting QB. He has proven to be mediocre so hence he’s a back-up. I think that Tebow and ALL of his supporters would be thrilled to see him get the opportunities Grossman has had.

            The car salesman analogy is also crap because he only has one metric that matters and that, as you’ve correctly pointed out, is his closing ratio. Unless I’m missing something, this would equate to a win-loss record which for Tebow is 8-6. Sounds like a winning record to me but Tebow’s success or failure is not (despite what some may say) only dependent on him.

          6. kentsterling Post author

            I’m equating each attempted pass as a separate transaction, and it those, he has the worst closing rate of any QB to start 14 or more regular season games since 2010.

            My guess is that the Society for the Denial of Tim Tebow’s Mediocrity would feel slighted with Tebow on a roster, but not able to play.

            It’s so unfair that Peyton Manning spent his entire career in Indianapolis throwing to two Hall of Famers like Reggie Wayne and Marvin Harrison.

            You permanently knuckleheads lost me when you dragged Manning into a comparison.

          7. Chad

            A relative skinny body of work? The dude is 25 years old, won a Heisman, 2 national championships, 9-7 as a starter and 1-1 in the playoffs. Skinny body of work? Me not think so.

          8. kentsterling Post author

            The jury is still out in St. Louis on Sam Bradford, and he’s started 42 games. In Tebow’s 16 starts, he completed 50% or less of his passes 13 times. To be kind, that’s consistently mediocre.

          9. Chad

            Key word: 16 starts. And I see you bring up 50% passing completion. So what? His game is much more than passing. His game is about winning, whatever it takes. There are more ways to win than pass only. Tebow has proven that time and time again. 16 starts, that’s not alot of starts for you to consider him done. An objectional person would consider 16 starts just the beginning.

          10. kentsterling Post author

            Curtis Painter has eight career starts. Let’s give him another turn as a starter – we’ve only seen half of what he brings to the table compared to Tebow.

            Why are all the statistics that paint Tebow accurately as mediocre automatically discounted?

          11. Bruce Bateman

            Kent two questions for you:

            1. How many other relevant statistics for Tebow can you provide besides completion percentage that “accurately paint him as mediocre”? Your question implied that there were many being ignored.

            2. Why are all the statistics that paint him favorably or better (I listed several) when compared to other successful QB’s ignored?

            Maybe we should ask Merrill? 😉

          12. kentsterling Post author

            Leading the NFL in fumbles despite only starting 11 games in 2011 is indicative of mediocrity. His productivity is not consistent. There were a few good games, like the playoff win against the Steelers. There were others in 2011 where he was brutal.

            Those statistics aren’t ignored – they are just dwarfed in importance by fumbles and incompletions.

            I hope the Jaguars sign him and build their whole offense around him. While it would make ESPN a little tedious on Monday morning, the NFL would be more fun.

  5. Terry Harder

    In a clutch situation and with the game on the line I would take Tim Tebow way before Peyton Manning! I followed Manning when I was in Tennessee and he was with the Vols. I watched him lose time and time and time again when the game was on the line.

    Reply
    1. kentsterling Post author

      In the playoffs, I agree that Manning gets tight and underperforms his regular season based expectations. In the regular season, I would take Manning over every quarterback in NFL history. He has led 49 career game winning drives – second all-time behind Dan Marino’s 51, has posted an NFL record 38 game winning drives, and an overall record of 154-70.

      Reply
  6. Chad

    Why Tebow is such a polarizing figure is beyond me. These back and forth arguements with Tebow haters are circular, they get nowhere. No matter how many games he wins, or championships or whatever, they do not care. They can’t even acknowlege he’s a winner. Tebow supporters acknowledge that Tebow is not the best thrower and is not the best QB, at least I do. But all Tebow supporters want is for a team to beleive in him, go all in with personnel that makes sense with his skill sets, and give him a chance. That is not too much to ask. Oh, and Josh McDaniels seemed to think Tebow was worth drafting. Ask Brady how much he respects McDaniels….

    Reply
    1. Bruce Bateman

      Chad,

      Very well said. You’re absolutely right… there is no hope of getting Tebow haters to see the fallacy in the arguments they present. IF Tebow was given a fair opportunity to develop and play and failed after that then I would be the first to admit his failure. In a sport where WINNING is the final metric, Tebow has certainly done enough to warrant a full opportunity to succeed.

      The big thing I always take issue with is the mean-spirited manner in which some of the doubters express their opinions. The original point of this argument was everyone’s distaste with the way Merrill Hoge choses to express his. Kent has seemed to ignore the fact that there hasn’t been one post on this discussion that has supported his view of Hoge’s style of analysis.

      Reply
      1. kentsterling Post author

        There are no Tebow haters. He does not inspire hate with either his behavior or his play as a quarterback. That is the fallacy that you proffer – that it’s personal, or betrays an anti-faith agenda. That Tebow just isn’t very good isn’t the fault of those who evaluate him from franchise offices or media desks. It isn’t even Tebow’s fault. It’s just a fact.

        Because those who support Tebow do so for personal reasons – often faith-based – they cannot fathom that those who disagree do so for any other reason.

        Tebow is not very good, and the truth is that his devotees do him more harm than good. The passion for Tebow is so strong among a small but loud group of football fans, signing him brings phone calls, complaints, constant harping about his not being given a fair opportunity, etc…, his presence on the roster is not worth the trouble.

        Reply
  7. Pauly Balst

    An honest, striaghtforward question for Tebow supporters from someone who has barely followed this story: Is it accurate that NFL teams would pick Tebow up if he were willing to switch positions, say, to tight end? If true, how does that discriminate against his personal Christian faith?

    In other words, the implication is he is not given a chance because of his outward Christianity, gets that’s forgotten if he’s a tight end? Makes no sense if that’s the case.

    I’ve always liked and admired Tebow. I’m somewhere between a fan and indifferent. My kids love him, and I couldn’t be happier about the example he sets.

    But I’m just not buying this conspiracy business. A lot of QBs would be successful under Urban Meyer at FL.

    Reply
  8. Jim Craft

    Interesting and robust debate.

    I’m a long time football fan and looking past the strictly emotional comments and focusing on the facts I would have to agree with Bruce. The jury may still be out on whether Tebow will be a top NFL quarterback but to say he has no talent is ridiculous. I have followed the Steelers for years, especially their defense, so I wasn’t rooting for the Broncos in the playoff game. But seeing what Tebow did in that game, coming from behind, throwing for over 300 yards, the physical punishment he took, his determination, he just never gave up.

    I also remember when Hoge made his comments on ESPN and I recall the other commentators seemed a bit shocked by his “analysis”. I believe he did go overboard and he definitely came across as mean-spirited. Criticism is one thing but personal character attacks do not seem appropriate. It may not be a conspiracy but to attack a player in that way with such little foundation makes one wonder if Hoge had a more personal agenda. The remarks were offensive and unprofessional.

    Reply
    1. kentsterling Post author

      The jury is not out on whether Tebow will be a top quarterback. There is never been a top quarterback in the history of the NFL who was been released twice before the beginning of his fourth season who ever became anything more than a journeyman.

      Reply
  9. Phil

    Hoge was criticized for his hatred, not his assessment of Tebow. Tebow had a winning record with Denver. Did you happen to miss that. If he’s given a real chance, Tebow can play QB in the NFL.

    Reply

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